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How Street Smart Are You?

We’ve all heard the stories, the kid who couldn’t quite cut it in school but still found a way to beat the odds and become a success. Started from the bottom…well, you know the rest. Being “book smart” and excelling in the classroom is important, but it doesn’t paint the whole picture. Many successful people like Jay-Z, Mark Zuckerberg and even Katy Perry have reached their goals by making the most of the skills they have learned outside of the classroom, or what we commonly refer to as “street smarts”.

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When we think of being “street smart” the assumption is that this pertains to someone who has learned how to adapt and survive in a tough neighborhood or has taken the code of the streets and applied it to the business world. Street smarts is actually a measure of one’s resilience, adaptability, resourcefulness, critical thinking and problem solving skills. All of which are key skills for the 21st century.

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There are no rules that say you can only be book smart or street smart and not both. Street smarts also has nothing to do with the crime rate in your city and your ability to avoid danger. It is a measure of your ability to problem solve when presented with an unforeseen obstacle. Many jobs of the future will no longer come with instructions or training, computers will take care of most of the routine work. Jobs of the future will be based on one’s ability to react in the moment, think critically and solve problems that computers can’t. Street smarts have less to do with how well you know the streets, and more to do with adapting to change, overcoming obstacles and solving problems with limited resources.

Take the quiz below to test your street smarts and see if you’re ready to take on the world!

Late Night With Jimmy Fallon - Season 5

Networking with the Many Faces of Jimmy Fallon

 

Lights, Camera, Action!

Networking is a type of performance. Professional relationships are different from friendships in that the fundamental purpose is mutually benefitting each other’s careers. This means that networking conversations are not exactly about getting to know the other person. Instead, a networking conversation consists of several people performing to each other as more valuable versions of themselves.

This sounds dishonest, but it isn’t. Every job requires some form of performance, from pretending to be more excited about your company’s products, to performing friendliness to coworkers and bosses, to even performing as accessible and fun on social media. Acting as a better version of yourself is part of every job.

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You Catch More Flies With Honey

When networking, professionals perform as their most trustworthy, most likeable, and most important selves. It’s no surprise that Jimmy Fallon, who performs as likeable characters, is a master at networking.

Fallon’s roles and personas are all based on likeability and accessibility. Even his Southie teen Sully is based on an open, good-hearted style of humor. His celebrity impressions, from Adam Sandler to Neil Young, are friendlier, more honest versions of the real celebrities.

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What Would Jimmy Do?

All his characters, in real life, would be excellent at building professional relationships.  In this lesson, students will use these characters as foils for developing networking strategies. They will decide how to approach the Weekend Update guy, how to impress Jarret of the slacker webcast, and even think about what they could offer Tonight Show Jimmy Fallon himself. Finally, students will act out a networking event with their classmates.

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How Street Smart Are You?

We’ve all heard the stories, the kid who couldn’t quite cut it in school but still found a way to beat the odds and become a success. Started from the bottom…well, you know the rest. Being “book smart” and excelling in the classroom is important, but it doesn’t paint the whole picture. Many successful people like Jay-Z, Mark Zuckerberg and even Katy Perry have reached their goals by making the most of the skills they have learned outside of the classroom, or what we commonly refer to as “street smarts”.

When we think of being “street smart” the assumption is that this pertains to someone who has learned how to adapt and survive in a tough neighborhood or has taken the code of the streets and applied it to the business world. Street smarts is actually a measure of one’s resilience, adaptability, resourcefulness, critical thinking and problem solving skills. All of which are key skills for the 21st century.

There are no rules that say you can only be book smart or street smart and not both. Street smarts also has nothing to do with the crime rate in your city and your ability to avoid danger. It is a measure of your ability to problem solve when presented with an unforeseen obstacle. Many jobs of the future will no longer come with instructions or training, computers will take care of most of the routine work. Jobs of the future will be based on one’s ability to react in the moment, think critically and solve problems that computers can’t. Street smarts have less to do with how well you know the streets, and more to do with adapting to change, overcoming obstacles and solving problems with limited resources.

Take the quiz below to test your street smarts and see if you’re ready to take on the world!

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Blueprint to a Mogul: Reaching Goals Like Shonda Rhimes

 

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Shonda Rhimes is one of the most powerful people in television. As the creator of Grey’s Anatomy, Scandal, and How to get Away with Murder, she is the backbone of ABC. And ABC lets her do whatever she wants. When Rhimes was criticized for refusing to read notes from the executives on Scandal, she simply replied, “What were they going to do, fire me?”

Rhimes wasn’t always a powerhouse. In college, Shonda wanted to write world-changing novels like her hero Toni Morrison. However, she found that there was no point in aspiring to be like Morrison. As she put it, “I couldn’t be Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison, because Toni Morrison already had that job and she wasn’t interested in giving it up.”

In 2002, she was a B-list screenwriter who had just adopted a child. While looking after the baby, she found herself watching a lot of network TV, including 24, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and Angel.

Rhimes got where she is by writing what she wanted to see on TV. This makes her style, and even her genre, hard to pin down. Is Grey’s Anatomy a medical drama or a romantic soap? Is Scandal a romance, a political drama, or a conspiracy thriller? No one knows what to say about her work, other than that it’s something that no one has seen before.

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In that spirit, this lesson isn’t about how to become TV mogul Shonda Rhimes, she already has that job. What you can do is put in the kind of work that Rhimes put in, to become a creative mogul on your own terms. This lesson will help you assess what you can offer to the world and figure out what you need in order to build a new creative empire.

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How Street Smart Are You?

We’ve all heard the stories, the kid who couldn’t quite cut it in school but still found a way to beat the odds and become a success. Started from the bottom…well, you know the rest. Being “book smart” and excelling in the classroom is important, but it doesn’t paint the whole picture. Many successful people like Jay-Z, Mark Zuckerberg and even Katy Perry have reached their goals by making the most of the skills they have learned outside of the classroom, or what we commonly refer to as “street smarts”.

When we think of being “street smart” the assumption is that this pertains to someone who has learned how to adapt and survive in a tough neighborhood or has taken the code of the streets and applied it to the business world. Street smarts is actually a measure of one’s resilience, adaptability, resourcefulness, critical thinking and problem solving skills. All of which are key skills for the 21st century.

There are no rules that say you can only be book smart or street smart and not both. Street smarts also has nothing to do with the crime rate in your city and your ability to avoid danger. It is a measure of your ability to problem solve when presented with an unforeseen obstacle. Many jobs of the future will no longer come with instructions or training, computers will take care of most of the routine work. Jobs of the future will be based on one’s ability to react in the moment, think critically and solve problems that computers can’t. Street smarts have less to do with how well you know the streets, and more to do with adapting to change, overcoming obstacles and solving problems with limited resources.

Take the quiz below to test your street smarts and see if you’re ready to take on the world!

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The RLL Podcast: Ep. 3 – Student Leadership, Black Genius and how Drake Redefined Masculinity

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How do we encourage young people to become leaders in the age of cyberbullying and social media bashing? How do Beyonce, Kendrick and Kanye walk the thin line between Black Genius and madness? And how has Drake redefined young men’s idea of masculinity? We tackle all of these difficult questions with our amazing guests – motivational speaker, poet and educator MrJeffDess (@MrJeffDess), Founder of TrillorNotTrill.com and Lakisha Odlum (@MzUrbanEducator), 7th grade English Teacher at Eagle Academy Queens and pre-service instructor at Teachers College, Columbia University.

Subscribe on iTunes 


Ep. 3 – Show Notes:

Check out all of the great work mentioned in this episode:

Trill or Not Trill

Adam Goodes

Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows by Amandla Stenberg

Noisey: Bompton

Black Genius by Fader Magazine

 

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How Street Smart Are You?

We’ve all heard the stories, the kid who couldn’t quite cut it in school but still found a way to beat the odds and become a success. Started from the bottom…well, you know the rest. Being “book smart” and excelling in the classroom is important, but it doesn’t paint the whole picture. Many successful people like Jay-Z, Mark Zuckerberg and even Katy Perry have reached their goals by making the most of the skills they have learned outside of the classroom, or what we commonly refer to as “street smarts”.

When we think of being “street smart” the assumption is that this pertains to someone who has learned how to adapt and survive in a tough neighborhood or has taken the code of the streets and applied it to the business world. Street smarts is actually a measure of one’s resilience, adaptability, resourcefulness, critical thinking and problem solving skills. All of which are key skills for the 21st century.

There are no rules that say you can only be book smart or street smart and not both. Street smarts also has nothing to do with the crime rate in your city and your ability to avoid danger. It is a measure of your ability to problem solve when presented with an unforeseen obstacle. Many jobs of the future will no longer come with instructions or training, computers will take care of most of the routine work. Jobs of the future will be based on one’s ability to react in the moment, think critically and solve problems that computers can’t. Street smarts have less to do with how well you know the streets, and more to do with adapting to change, overcoming obstacles and solving problems with limited resources.

Take the quiz below to test your street smarts and see if you’re ready to take on the world!

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“Bullied to Death”: Not an Exaggeration

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Bullying: It’s A Real Problem

Teenagers often use the term “to death” as a way to exaggerate their feelings. “I’m bored to death” is a common saying in classrooms across the country. Kids might exclaim “I was scared to death!” after seeing a particularly terrifying horror movie.

However, over the past few years, the words “to death” have taken on a much more literal meaning. Across the country, numerous students have actually been bullied to death.

A Google search of the term “bullied to death” returns headlines about a teenager who was hanged for being pretty, a New York City teen who jumped in front of a subway train after being bullied, and Delaware girl who was beaten to death over a relationship with a boy. The latter two of those stories occurred recently, in April of 2016. There’s even a Wikipedia page dedicated to suicides that have been attributed to bullying.

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Why Has There Been An Increase In Deaths From Bullying?

So what’s caused this wave of bullying that has literally cost some people their lives? There are various factors to consider, and many point to the rise of social media. On the other hand, some experts claim that kids being bullied to death is not a new phenomenon, but instead that this era of mass media simply allows more people to hear such stories than in the past.

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The connection between bullying and suicide is complicated, as the site StopBullying.gov points out. However, just understanding that there might be a connection is an important lesson for many children. It is also crucial that kids understand the so-called “bystander effect,” in which people watch idly as others are bullied. According to the site NoBullying,  “The bystanders who do nothing but watch are also the problem. Thus, the bystander effect can make kids more passive instead of more proactive when dealing with bullying.”

Examining the recent instances of bullying to death might allow teenagers to begin to help reverse this disturbing trend. If today’s kids can understand the causes of some of these bullying tragedies, they might be better able to help avoid more of them in the future.

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How Street Smart Are You?

We’ve all heard the stories, the kid who couldn’t quite cut it in school but still found a way to beat the odds and become a success. Started from the bottom…well, you know the rest. Being “book smart” and excelling in the classroom is important, but it doesn’t paint the whole picture. Many successful people like Jay-Z, Mark Zuckerberg and even Katy Perry have reached their goals by making the most of the skills they have learned outside of the classroom, or what we commonly refer to as “street smarts”.

When we think of being “street smart” the assumption is that this pertains to someone who has learned how to adapt and survive in a tough neighborhood or has taken the code of the streets and applied it to the business world. Street smarts is actually a measure of one’s resilience, adaptability, resourcefulness, critical thinking and problem solving skills. All of which are key skills for the 21st century.

There are no rules that say you can only be book smart or street smart and not both. Street smarts also has nothing to do with the crime rate in your city and your ability to avoid danger. It is a measure of your ability to problem solve when presented with an unforeseen obstacle. Many jobs of the future will no longer come with instructions or training, computers will take care of most of the routine work. Jobs of the future will be based on one’s ability to react in the moment, think critically and solve problems that computers can’t. Street smarts have less to do with how well you know the streets, and more to do with adapting to change, overcoming obstacles and solving problems with limited resources.

Take the quiz below to test your street smarts and see if you’re ready to take on the world!

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The RLL Podcast: Ep. 6 – Curiosity, Hustle and Fear of Failure with Bilal Zaidi from CreatorLab.fm

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Our mission here is to help you find the path to your goals by sharing the journey others have taken. I sit down with Bilal Zaidi, the host of one of the best new podcasts out there today CreatorLab.fm. We learn his amazing life story from hustling as a kid in London, to working at Google and now getting a chance to interview with entrepreneurs at the top of their game from Brian Wong to the Young Turks. I do my best to try and identify the life skills he’s learned along the way and we discover how curiosity, hustle, self-teaching and even the fear of failure can all serve as stepping stones to success.

Subscribe on iTunes 


Ep. 6 – Show Notes:

Be sure to check out CreatorLab.fm or subscribe to the show on iTunes here.

You can find Bilal on Twitter @BZaidi

Creator Lab is @Creatorlabfm on Twitter, Instagram and FB

Some cool guests mentioned to appear on his show are:
Nico Perez of MixCloud
Scott Harrison of charity:water
Brian Wong – Forbes 30 under 30, youngest person to raise VC money, founder of Kiip and author of the Cheat Code
Esther Tricoche – Forbes 30 under 30, Associate Partner at NewSchools Venture Fund
The Young Turks – Online news icons

Also, gotta give my fam a shoutout, here’s the student leadership organization I mentioned I was a part of along with J. Cole. Haraya, always doing big things and turning students into game-changing leaders.