Using Superhero Alter-Egos to Understand Basic Freudian Psychology

This lesson helps students understand basic Freudian psychology by having them apply his theories to popular superheroes. In every superhero story, we see two sides to the hero’s character, her/his human side and her/his superhuman side. The human side is often comprised of traits to which an audience can easily relate: loneliness, an inability to conform, unrequited love, etc. For example, Peter Parker of Spider-Man is a socially isolated nerd who can barely get the girl of his dreams to notice him. His superhuman side, on the other hand, is fearless, powerful, and exceedingly popular. Have your students use Freud’s theory of the id, ego, and superego to analyze how and why these humans transform into their respective superhero alter-egos.

Obesity in America: A Plan to Get Fit Part 2

In this lesson, students continue to learn about obesity by exploring healthier food alternatives that taste just as good as “junk food.” In addition, students create a food plan based on the 60/30 model (60% carbohydrates/30% fats and proteins) that they will implement in their lives to lose weight and be healthier.

#CuttingForBieber: The Power of Social Networks

Recently, a disturbing online campaign was created as a response to the exposure of Justin Bieber’s marijuana use. Started by online pranksters from the image board website 4Chan, the hashtag #CuttingForBieber showed tweets with pictures of fans who allegedly cut themselves in hopes that Bieber would stop smoking marijuana to prevent fans from continuing their self-mutilation. In this lesson, students will create their own anti-drug campaigns as a response to the drastic measures displayed on 4Chan.

The Elements of Product Placement

The objective of this lesson is to have students look at existing product placements with a critical eye and develop a product placement plan for an existing product.

Product placements in movies and television shows have become quite a common practice in media. Companies commonly use product placements to promote their brands in an unconventional and sometimes hidden way. If you pay close enough attention to any movie or TV show, you can probably spot a few cleverly placed products ranging from sports drinks to electronics to clothing brands. An example of product placement can be seen in Steven Spielberg’s hit movie E.T. with his inclusion of Reese’s Pieces and television shows like American Idol, which has Coca-Cola logos strategically placed throughout the competition.

YOLO: Take Care of Your Ears!

In this lesson, The Lonely Island’s “YOLO” is used to introduce the topics of noise and hearing loss. Students learn about how the inner workings of our ears enable us to hear and how these sensitive mechanisms are easily and irreparably harmed.

MLK and Malcolm X: The Civil Rights Movement and the X-Men Origins

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The American Civil Rights movement inspired many people, including Marvel Comic’s mastermind writers Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. They have created some of the most powerful superheroes in the comic universe but did you know some of these characters were influenced by actual real life heroes in history? Lee and Kirby used the iconic civil rights leaders Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X as the inspiration behind the characters Charles Xavier aka Professor X and Erik Lehnsherr aka Magneto, the creators of the X-Men. Rather than fighting aliens and criminals, they fought against the oppression mutants faced on a daily basis in society, albeit by different methods. Much like MLK Jr. and Malcolm X, Professor X chose a non-violent approach and Magneto took more of a defensive stance against violent oppression and prejudice.

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It’s presumed in comic book lore that Magneto is a villain but Stan Lee had a different perspective when he created the character. Stan Lee says about the metal warping mutant, “I did not think of Magneto as a bad guy. He was just trying to strike back at the people who were so bigoted and racist. He was trying to defend mutants, and because society was not treating them fairly, he decided to teach society a lesson. He was a danger of course, but I never thought of him as a villain.”

Even in the film adaptations of the X-Men series, Michael Fassbender who plays the role of Magneto, admits the iconic figures were inspiration for their on-screen portrayals.
“It came up early on in the rehearsal period and that was the path we took”, says Michael Fassbender, “These two brilliant minds coming together and their views aren’t that different on some key things. As you watch them you know that if their understanding, ability and intelligence could somehow come together it would be really special. But the split is what makes them even more interesting and tragic.” The Hero Complex, LA Times

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MLK and Malcolm X: The civil rights movement and the X-Men origins

The American Civil Rights movement inspired many people, including Marvel Comic’s mastermind writers Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. They have created some of the most powerful superheroes in the comic universe but did you know some of these characters were influenced by actual real life heroes in history? Lee and Kirby used the iconic civil rights leaders Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X as the inspiration behind the characters Charles Xavier aka Professor X and Erik Lehnsherr aka Magneto, the creators of the X-Men. Rather than fighting aliens and criminals, they fought against the oppression mutants faced on a daily basis in society, albeit by different methods. Much like MLK Jr. and Malcolm X, Professor X chose a non-violent approach and Magneto took more of a defensive stance against violent oppression and prejudice.

It’s presumed in comic book lore that Magneto is a villain but Stan Lee had a different perspective when he created the character. Stan Lee says about the metal warping mutant, “I did not think of Magneto as a bad guy. He was just trying to strike back at the people who were so bigoted and racist. He was trying to defend mutants, and because society was not treating them fairly, he decided to teach society a lesson. He was a danger of course, but I never thought of him as a villain.”

Even in the film adaptations of the X-Men series, Michael Fassbender who plays the role of Magento, admits the iconic figures were inspiration for their on-screen portrayals.
It came up early on in the rehearsal period and that was the path we took, says Michael Fassbender, These two brilliant minds coming together and their views arent that different on some key things. As you watch them you know that if their understanding, ability and intelligence could somehow come together it would be really special. But the split is what makes them even more interesting and tragic. The Hero Complex, LA Times